A GREAT HOBBY FOR THE RICH & FAMOUS... LIKE US

April 1, 2018 | By Ted Kade

A round this time of year, people who know that you own vintage vehicles come to realize exactly why you enjoy your special cars and trucks.

After all, your vintage rides give you an opportunity to mingle and socialize with various celebrities and—better still—you can make a lot of money buying and selling those vehicles that carry such importance for you.

At least that’s the impression some folks might get if their only involvement with the vintage vehicle hobby comes from watching or reading about the major collector car auctions that always take place early in the year.

For example, consider Barrett-Jackson’s 47th Annual Scottsdale, Arizona, Auction. Among those in attendance at the major vintage vehicle event were Jay Leno, country singer Kenny Chesney, and actors David Spade and Tim Allen. Yet another person who put in an appearance was former President George W. Bush…no doubt an acquaintance of yours from car shows and swap meets in your area.

1970
1970 Plymouth Hemi Road Runner. Sold for $214,000

Now about the money that changed hands… Barrett-Jackson’s Scottsdale event saw 1721 vehicles sell for a total of some $107 million, while 1100 pieces of automobilia brought in more than $3.7 million.

1965
1965 Shelby Cobra CSX 4000 Roadster. Sold for $222,000

Among the biggest sales were:

•1952 Ferrari 212 Europa: $1.1 million

•1969 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1: $770,000

•1966 Shelby GT350 Prototype #001: $605,000

•1968 Chevrolet Corvette L88: $495,000

•1970 Pontiac GTO Judge Ram Air IV Convertible: $440,000

•1970 Plymouth Hemi Road Runner: $214,000

•1957 Ford Thunderbird E-Code: $183,700

•1951 Cadillac Custom Coupe: $150,700

•1951 Chevrolet Styleline Deluxe Convertible: $126,500

•Circa 1939 Husky Gasoline porcelain service station sign: $149,500

1952
1952 Ferrari Europa. Sold for $1.1 million.

1951
1951 Chevrolet Styleline Deluxe Convertible. Sold for $126,500.

Commenting on the results, Steve Davis, president of Barrett-Jackson, said, “This year, prime examples of high-profile ’60s muscle cars continued to be strong, while customs, hot rods, trucks and SUVs were particularly popular; several setting world records. Some of the most hotly contested bidding was for custom 1950s-era cars and trucks, while 1980s cars keep trending higher.”

Next Stop…Palm Beach, Florida

The reports of vintage cars and trucks bringing in big monetary returns will surface again this month as Barrett-Jackson brings “a star-studded lineup” to its 16th Annual Palm Beach Auction scheduled for April 12- 15 at the South Florida Fairgrounds.

“Palm Beach has provided some electric moments over the years, including last year when a 1971 Custom K5 Blazer sold for a record $220,000,” Davis said in announcing this year’s Florida event. “This will be our best Palm Beach lineup ever, especially with John Staluppi’s immaculate (Cars of Dreams Collection) of American cars from the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s. The great docket, combined with the vehicles we’ll be auctioning for charity, will make this year’s Palm Beach Auction truly memorable.”

To Sell or Not To Sell…

What’s that? You say you don’t think your favorite car or truck is quite in condition to cross the auction block for a six- or sevenfigure payday… Then you’ll just have to go on having a great time driving it and keeping it in top operating condition. And if someone asks why you haven’t cashed in on the ongoing vintage vehicle sales bonanzas, just say that prices will have to climb considerably higher before you’d even consider parting with your prized vehicle. What's that? You say you don’t think your favorite car or truck is quite in condition to cross the auction block for a six- or sevenfigure payday… Then you’ll just have to go on having a great time driving it and keeping it in top operating condition. And if someone asks why you haven’t cashed in on the ongoing vintage vehicle sales bonanzas, just say that prices will have to climb considerably higher before you’d even consider parting with your prized vehicle.

–Ted Kade, Editor